Wednesday , July 20 2022

Should I still grow carrying vegetables or switch to winter lovers?

picture

Beet seedlings and seeds at the bottom, then Tatsoi, Swiss chard and Lacinata kale seedlings. The bed is covered with a fruit tree net and staked out every 3 feet to keep away skunks and other diggers (they don’t want their claws to get caught in the net; it works well to keep cats out too). The seedlings ripen and are eaten first, when the seeds germinate, they are planted elsewhere in the garden. Asparagus ferns can develop until they die of their own accord – all this energy flows back into the roots for later harvests.

picture

Lacilata kale was chewed when left in a pack of 6 overnight. As long as the knots and maybe a leaf are still left, it is worth transplanting the plant – and protecting it from further looters with a net.

picture

Texas Everbearing fig fruits are large, very sweet and full-bodied. Great timing, a month later than other figs – we’ll see if that’s just because it’s the first year.

picture

The gray-green foliage of the California fuchsia is beautifully highlighted by its red-orange flowers.

picture

Tips from blackberry vines are anchored in the ground to sprout roots that I can transplant in early spring.

picture

Oro gold grapefruit. The burnt edges of the leaves come from sunburn on the too hot days, which I would have had to water beforehand to completely moisturize the leaves and better withstand damage.

picture

Spider lily. Years ago I bought a light bulb that I thought was too expensive, but last year I planted 10 of them. Ultimately, it was an economical purchase – at least that’s my excuse to repeat the process!

picture

Amarcrinum from a friend is a lighter pink than my original one.

picture

Rose hips make wonderfully bright Christmas decorations.

picture

Eucomas that bloom well here, even though they’re only 1 foot tall.

Are you still thinking about growing these still-bearing tomato plants? This persistent warm daytime weather keeps many plants actively green and growing, still looks attractive, and bears fruit and flowers – if not as abundantly – in the garden. The debate is always whether these still powerful plants should be raised in favor of switching to eating and decorating items in cold weather. You have several options, depending on your garden area and your preferences for eating and viewing.

Wear plants over the winter
If your garden doesn’t get frost, you may have some of these tomatoes and possibly pumpkin, cucumber, and beans that will bear fruit until spring and beyond.
Although the amount you will get will be quite sparse and the taste will hardly be any better than what you would buy on the market, the idea of ​​continuing to have your own home-grown summer products in winter is reassuring for every gardener , but especially beginners – a real feeling of success in overcoming the seasons!
If this is your goal, leave the plants in place, cut off dead growth, cut tomatoes on the new shoots, and continue feeding and watering to keep the plants bearing flowers and fruits.

Continue to the plants of the winter season
If your garden has more space or you prefer to grow and enjoy edible plants that really thrive in cold weather – such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, lettuce, leek, onions, radishes, spinach, beets – and ornamental plants – such as marigold, chrysanthemum, Coreopsis, Hollyhock, Delphinium, Poppy, Snapdragon, Peas and Wildflowers – then read my monthly tips for October and November – http://www.gardeninginla.net/monthly-tips.html – for whom you have many options and visit yours local kindergarten to find the beauties available.
When you do this shift, pull out the worn plants, change the soil with compost and manure (and coffee grounds, if any), and plant new seedlings and seeds.

I prefer growing plants in their preferred seasons when they thrive rather than trying to maintain plants that don’t work as well because they struggle to survive in an uninviting environment.
But it’s always fun when you have the garden space to “play” with some plants that you just want to see what’s going to happen. This is how you get to know the microclimate in your own garden and what you can do if you want to extend the seasons.
For example, when I started working in the garden, I grew corn, melons and winter squash to see how they grew and produced, but after that I didn’t worry because I was able to buy much better tasting and not at farmers’ markets. I don’t have to “waste” my own garden space by growing some things that don’t really work well. Then I had the experience of knowing something about these plants, and I was able to concentrate on growing the plants that we enjoyed the most and that I produced the most for the effort I had in my garden.

Plant bulbs
This is definitely the time to plant all the winter, spring, and summer flowering bulbs you can get your hands on.
Onions guarantee attractive foliage and flowers in the garden, always a pleasure when they choose to appear, and many continue to multiply over the years.
They are perfect for beginners, as they have their own food supply for at least the first year and, after soaking for the first time, endure neglect and drought and still let their hearts bloom.
Even those that are more expensive than you want to spend will thrive and multiply over the years – even so much that you will distribute them in your own garden and share them with all your garden friends!

About huseyin

Check Also

Screen-free Sundays, Maria von Trapp and mud cake kitchens

I’ve worked in PR for many years, but I’m starting to think that I’ve never …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *